Bolaño in Brazil

I wanted to point out an excellent new blog that is translating the many interviews of Roberto Bolaño into Portuguese:

http://estrelaselvagem.wordpress.com/

Also, cialis 40mg 2666 will soon be published in Brazil. Here is the cover:

What are some other resources for Bolaño fans in Brazil?

Week 8: Locations

by Sara Corona Goldstein

Huntsville, pill Arizona – Lucy Anne Sander lived here. (p. 406)

Mississippi – Lucy Anne Sander was born here. (p. 406)

Calle Verdejo, in Colonia Centro-Norte – the American consulate is here. (p. 407)

Diego Riveras School, in Colonia Lomas del Toro – Mónica Durán Reyes was kidnapped from here. Rebecca Fernández de Hoyos is found in this Colonia, also. (p. 412)

Oaxaca – Rebecca Fernández de Hoyos is from here. (p. 412)

Internal Affairs on Avenida Madero-Norte – a whorehouse where Harry Magaña befriends Demetrio Águila. (p. 415)

Calle Luciérnaga in Colonia Rubén Darío – Águila has a house here, where he lets Magaña stay. (p. 415)

Churcarit – Magaña discovers a love letter written to Miguel Montes by a girl from here. Magaña and Águilar agree that this is Montes’ hometown. (p. 422)

Calle Alondra, in Colonia Podestá – in November 1994 a woman’s body is found here in on the second floor of a building under construction. (p. 424)

Profesor Emilio Cervantes, in Colonia Lomas del Toro – Silvana Pérez Arjona attended school here until she had to drop out. (p. 426)

Nácori Grande – Florita Almada (La Santa) was born here. (p. 429)

Villa Pesqueria – Florita Almada and her family move here. She marries a livestock dealer. (p. 429)

Hermosillo – Reinaldo’s TV show, on which Florita Almada appears, has its station here. (p. 434)

Guaymas – the ventriloquist on Reinaldo’s TV show is from here. (p. 434)

Churcarit – Harry Magaña travels here, meets María del Mar Enciso Montes, and visits Miguel Montes’ house. (p. 437)

Tijuana – Magaña travels here, calls his friend from the LAPD, and meets Raúl Ramírez Cerezo and Chucho. (p. 440)

Calle Santa Catarina, in Colonia Carranza – Magaña goes to Elsa Fuentes’ house here. (p. 445)

Toconilco, Durango – Elsa Fuentes’ mother lives here. (p. 447)

Calle Portal de San Pablo – Magaña goes here, to Francisco Díaz’s house. (p. 448)

Querétaro – Paula García Zapatero is from here. (p. 454)

Sage, California – Abe (Conan) Mitchell, the American consul, spends time in his cabin here. (p. 455)

Escondido, California – Mitchell’s wife stays here with her sister while he is in Sage. (p. 455)

Michoacán – Mónica Posades and her family are from here. (p. 461)

Vasconelos Preparatory School, in Colonia Reforma – Marisa Hernández Silva attended school here. (p. 463)

Week 8: Dreams

by Daryl L.L. Houston

422: In spite of a keen awareness of their differences, order Juan de Dios Martinez has peaceful, sildenafil happy dreams of Elvira Campos and himself living together in a rustic cabin in the mountains. They slept on a bearskin with a wolfskin covering them, and she sometimes laughed and ran into the woods. I’m reminded of Pelletier’s domestic dreams of Norton, in which she too is on the periphery. At least in Martinez’s dream, he has interactions with Campos that precede her receding to the margins.

434: Here and elsewhere, La Santa has visions. They’re not strictly speaking dreams, but it seems a similar type of experience.

447: Harry Magaña dreams of a street in Huntsville pounded by a sandstorm. He ignores pleas for help rescuing some girls at a bead factory and keeps his nose in a file containing photocopied documents written in “a language not of this world.” There are several similar things among the critics’ dreams.

456: La Santa sometimes dreams she’s a country schoolteacher at a hilltop school from which she watches girls on their way to class. Beyond, peasants make fruitful agrarian use of the land. Though they’re in the distance, she can hear their words clearly, and the words are unchanging from day to day. Here I’m reminded of Espinoza’s dream of the painting in his hotel room. Then: “There were dreams in which everything fit together and other dreams in which nothing fit and the world was like a creaky coffin.”

459: La Santa equates her visions with dreams. They keep her awake. In actual dreams, she sees the crimes as if they’re an exploded television set, and she sees various horrible scenes in the shards scattered around her bedroom.

Here’s a question: Is Florita something of a narrator of this section? It is a fragmented portion of the book, many of the murders ghastly reflections or maybe refractions of others. Paired with the ventriloquist as she is in this week’s reading, perhaps we’re to take her as an adopted voice or instrument through which many of the scenes unfold. Maybe we’re seeing the scenes as she sees them in her visions. I doubt this is the intention, really, as the stories are told mostly from a pretty straightforward, detached-narrative point of view (I also happen to know what Bolaño said about who narrates the book), but it’s an interesting thing to ponder.

Catching up

We’re running a little behind in posting this week. I’ve been traveling. But we will catch up. Onward.




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